ST report 

 

On 28 April, The Straits Times reported that LTA has ordered Crime library to remove the missing persons’ posters that are put up at bus stops and pedestrian walkways. LTA spokesman said the posters may obstruct passersby or distract drivers and pose a safety hazard. Ironically, LTA suggested to Crime Library to pay for advertising space at ‘good’ locations for effective display of banners and posters. 

In my opinion, the reasons cited by LTA are lame and laughable and their stand towards poster display confusing too. If the posters arguably cause obstruction to passersby or distraction to the drivers, how does paying for advertising space solve the safety hazard problem as claimed by LTA? In advertising term, 'good' locations are usually areas where there are high human and vehicle traffic, so wouldn't the display of posters cause obstruction and distraction in those busy areas? I have difficulty connecting the money and safety issues together. Can someone please help me out? 

Despite LTA’s warning that the Crime Library could be fined for displaying banners and posters without permission, the founder of Crime Library would not budge. Mr Joseph Tan said he would not order his volunteers to take the posters down, nor would he consider buying advertising space from LTA. “We are a charity and there is really no money to spare,” said Mr Tan.  

I wish the Straits Times would follow up with LTA and give an update on the ‘fate’ of the Crime Library. It would be interesting to know if LTA would issue fines to the Crime Library. There is nothing wrong with LTA enforcing its policies but adopting a compassionate approach and helping the Crime Library to continue its good deed would be more appropriate and giving.  

According to the report, the Crime Library has an estimated number of 230 volunteers and it provides free service to help with unsolved crimes and disappearances. Since last December, it has helped locate about 110 of the 143 missing persons reported to the Crime Library.    

Read the full article at:

http://www.crime-library.org/story/embody.asp?id=37200

  

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